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The Marvel series finale undermines its own bold stab at systemic racism

Photo: Marvel Studios

Marvel’s series The Falcon and the Winter Soldier was doing just fine.


Representation isn’t reason enough to bask in Black trauma on television

Photo: Amazon

Along the course of writing this essay on Amazon’s new series Them: Covenant — in which I intended to recount my deep history with horror films and how Jaws ruined me for life — Duante Wright was killed by police in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota. Shortly thereafter, body cam footage from the March 29 shooting of 13-year-old Adam Toledo in Chicago hit the internet.


Just Rankin’ Shit

What the hell is happening in Westview, anyway?

Wanda Maximoff from Disney’s new TV series ‘Wandavision’
Wanda Maximoff from Disney’s new TV series ‘Wandavision’
Photo illustration, source: Marvel Studios via Disney+

5. Who the hell is the big surprise cameo?

Pretty much everyone involved with this show has been teasing a major guest appearance similar to when [redacted] showed up at the end of The Mandalorian. And while [redacted this time, but stop reading if you don’t want to know] showing up was big, it wasn’t big big. So who could it be? Magneto? Stephen Strange? Reed Richards? Nick Fury? The Bernie Sanders Meme? We thought we were going to get one this week but that didn’t happen, now we have no clue who’s coming. Dammit, Marvel. You win again.

4. Is Vision alive or dead?

A few weeks ago we saw zombie Vision, but then…


Life changes hit the rapper hard — and shows like ‘Tokyo Ghoul’ helped him process it all

Photo: Jeff Hahne/Getty Images

Since the ’90s, with Toonami curating anime for TV audiences and classics like Fist of the North Star circulating on VHS, Black America has been enamored with the Japanese medium. Just as martial arts films had in the decades before, anime turned its back on the redemptive narratives American media usually peddled, captivating viewers with stories of courage and willpower in the face of existential threat and internal conflict. It was hard not to find parallels; RZA once famously declared that, “Dragon Ball Z represents the journey of the Black man in America.”


Credit: Sony Pictures Television

Twenty-five years ago, Aaron McGruder introduced the world to the Freemans, and nothing would ever be the same

The Boondocks started out as a fallback plan.


Turning lemons into unapologetically Black cartoon characters

Photo; Jean-Marc Zaorski

Anyone who watches Dragon Ball Z knows that Piccolo is Black. Yes, he’s green. Yes, he was born from an egg. And yes, I know that technically he comes from Planet Namek. But to me, and to millions of other Black viewers, Piccolo is Black.


The newest Netflix obsession, Bridgerton, comes from TV’s peak pound-for-pound provocateur, Shonda Rhimes. And just like Shondaland productions Grey’s Anatomy, Scandal, and How to Get Away With Murder, Bridgerton’s propulsive dalliance with the messy underpinnings of society have all but endeared fans across the globe.


Just Rankin’ Sh!t

‘The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air’ homecoming is must-see TV, but don’t count on any of these happening

A photo of Donald Trump
A photo of Donald Trump
Photo illustration, source: Charles Eshelman/Getty Images

6. The Secret Diary of Desmond Pfeiffer

Having a reunion for this unfunny comedy premised on slavery would require actors to actually admit they took part, which we doubt anyone would do. We see you, Chi McBride!

5. Grey’s Anatomy

Sure, this warrants some sort of reunion. But it definitely won’t have Isaiah Washington’s cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs headass involved. He ruined that with the slurs and fighting that got him kicked off the damn show in the first place.

4. Community

This cult classic was way ahead of its time. But apparently Chevy Chase is a POS and everyone hated his entire guts. Nobody wanted to work with him — show…


The antebellum series serves as a case study for properly retelling Black liberation by avoiding White messiahs

Photo: William Gray/SHOWTIME

In Hollywood, White people love casting themselves as heroes, historical accuracy be damned. You’ve seen the trope before: the White saviors in film and television who, in one way or another, always manage to swoop in and save the day, uplifting (or outright liberating) Black folks left and right. How rewarding it must feel to watch characters who are so… redeemable. …


‘Power Book II: Ghost’ may be gone until later this year, but Kemp’s always planning the next chapter

Photo: Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images

Much like you, Courtney Kemp does not have time to watch all the things on all the networks and streaming services right now — or, really, ever. “The truth is, I watch so little TV,” she says over the phone. “I don’t experience content in the way that other people do.”

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