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LEVEL
Higher Learning. A publication from Medium for the interested man.

Environment

In LEVEL. More on Medium.

Transforming a landfill into an oceanside oasis isn’t easy, but it’s necessary

Against the backdrop of a cloudless blue sky, the sun washes over an enormous dune and the handful of palm trees that stabilize it.
Against the backdrop of a cloudless blue sky, the sun washes over an enormous dune and the handful of palm trees that stabilize it.
Photos courtesy of the author

As you drive down Puerto Rico’s Route 466, the Spanish-style houses and roadside start to peel away. The road buckles and plunges toward a white-capped Atlantic. Seaside cliffs rise, and trees stretch gnarled limbs into a semi-canopy.

Driving farther still, you reach the remnants of a dune sea tracing the asphalt. Beyond the sandy, mangrove-dotted hills, the sound of the ocean rises as it hammers the shore. This is the Mabodamaca Community Natural Reserve in Isabela, Puerto Rico. …


Nature is for everyone — yet the outdoors are consistently offered only as a White refuge

Photo: Vizerskaya/Getty Images

It takes time and pressure. Six hundred million years ago, what would one day be Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area sat beneath the ocean. Nearly two miles of sediment formed into a layer of white limestone; over eons, the Earth’s crust rose, displacing more sediment, rich with iron, that oxidized into the pale red color of the canyon walls. Today, more than two million people each year flock to Red Rock, 15 miles outside Las Vegas.

Lately, I’ve been pondering the idea of what it means to be Black in historically fraught spaces but never more so than when…

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