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I Grew Up African — But America Makes It Hard to Be Black

Where I’m from, color means little. That made my transition to the United States a chilling one.

Photo: Westend61/Getty Images

TThis time last year, I was free to travel anywhere I wanted in my native Cameroon, and no one blinked an eye. All I needed was my identity card and the privilege of my first name. Kamga is the most popular…

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Higher Learning. A publication from Medium for the interested man.

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Kamga Tchassa

Kamga Tchassa

Cameroonian writer and video creator. Featured in LEVEL and P.S. I Love You. I write about building relationships and personal transformation.

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